What is an analysis of the sonnet "On the Death of Richard West"?

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This is an Italian, or Petrarchan, sonnet. The first eight lines describe all the ways in which the narrator feels himself to be alone in his grief. The morning continues to come brightly, personified as "smiling"; the sunrise occurs beautifully, lifted by Phoebus Apollo himself, in an allusion to Greek...

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This is an Italian, or Petrarchan, sonnet. The first eight lines describe all the ways in which the narrator feels himself to be alone in his grief. The morning continues to come brightly, personified as "smiling"; the sunrise occurs beautifully, lifted by Phoebus Apollo himself, in an allusion to Greek mythology; the birds sing happily and lovingly, also personified; and the fields dress themselves in green clothing, as they are personified as well. However, the narrator wants to hear sad songs and sights rather than these happy ones, as his "lonely anguish melts no heart" but his, a metaphor comparing his anguish to something, perhaps, that melts with its intensity. He cannot feel joy, and the joy of the animals and objects in nature is "In vain to" the speaker.

The last six lines continue the personification of natural phenomena and creatures, as if to imply that everything and everyone in the world can feel joy except for the narrator. In the end, his tears are also "in vain" because they will not bring back his friend. The speaker's sadness and grief are "fruitless."

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