What is an alternative/additional representation of a section or character from Macbeth which can be performed i.e. an oral presentation?I am to do an assignment at school which requires me to...

What is an alternative/additional representation of a section or character from Macbeth which can be performed i.e. an oral presentation?

I am to do an assignment at school which requires me to deliver an original re-creation of a character or situation in the form of a soliloquy, eulogy or court room defence (assuming the role of one of the "villains" of the play who is being placed on trial).

I was thinking of doing a soliloquy by Macbeth around the scene where Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane (right before Macbeth gets killed)  in which Macbeth reflects on all the things that has happened (murder of King Duncan, Banquo, Macduff's family and death of Lady Macbeth) as well as his thoughts about half of the witches prophecy becoming true i.e. Birnam Wood is indeed coming to Dunsinan. If I were to do this, what motivations, emotions and, in general, thoughts should Macbeth be pondering at his moment in the play?

Feel free to suggest other possible representations of the characters and sections of "Macbeth" for which I could do for my aissgnment, as I am only at the brainstorming part of my assignment. Thanks in advance :)

 

Asked on by jiggle-boi

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susan3smith's profile pic

susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

What an interesting assignment.  I like your ideas very much.  The scene that  you chose iv quite suspenseful and shows a wide range of emotion from Macbeth.  It seems that here several thoughts and emotions are running through his head:

(1) He looks back over his past and realizes that his life has meant nothing, that he has no respect from men, that it has all been a "walking shadow."

(2)  He is very afraid.  Even though he thinks he has become numb to fear, the thought of thousands of men surrounding his castle has scared him.  He knows he does not have enough men to face Macduff and Malcolm's men "front to front," so he has stay behind the castle walls as they lay siege to the castle.  This fear perhaps is why he is in such a rush to put on his armor.

(3) His confidence in the witches prophecies is shaken.  He begins to doubt the "equivocation of the fiend/That lies like truth."  But he still has hope.  He clings to the prophecy that "no one born of woman shall harm Macbeth."  This line becomes his mantra as defeat looks more and more inevitable.

(4) He has courage as well.  He will not go down without a fight: "At least we'll die with harness on our back."

Good luck with this assignment.

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