What adjectives would best describe the tone of The Road Not Taken?

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Wistful is a particularly appropriate adjective in the context of "The Road Not Taken ". The word can be defined as having or showing a feeling of regretful longing, and this is undoubtedly the abiding mood of the poem. The speaker has taken a certain path in life, a...

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Wistful is a particularly appropriate adjective in the context of "The Road Not Taken". The word can be defined as having or showing a feeling of regretful longing, and this is undoubtedly the abiding mood of the poem. The speaker has taken a certain path in life, a path "less traveled." Yet he appears haunted by a nagging sense that this may not have been the right path to take; that he might well have made a wrong turn in his life. The generally wistful tone of the poem is encapsulated in the sigh of the last stanza. The speaker envisages telling his story of how he chose a certain path in life, and how it "made all the difference." But not necessarily in a good way.

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Here are several adjectives, or more loosely, 'describing' or 'modifying' words, that best suit the themes of The Road Not Taken.

Lamented: Permanent decisions are just that - permanent. The speaker seems to be regretful that the decision can only be made once.

Individual or non-conforming: The decisions we make inform the person we will become. Here the speaker has to literally choose the road on which to travel.

Indecisive: The poem has several interpretations. Rather than a reflection on a life that "could have been," the poem, according to some critics, is a jibe at Frost's contemporary, Edward Thomas, who was infamously indecisive.

Reflective: Another interpretation of the poem is that it explores the humanity of decisions. The turmoil and struggle of life is neatly presented here as an either/or option. Life itself is, of course, much more complex than this.

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