What are Aristotle's views on 'mimesis' in the Poetics?

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For Aristotle in the Poetics, mimesis, or imitation, springs from a basic human delight in mimicry. Aristotle's naturalistic approach to mimesis put him at odds with his teacher Plato, who saw mimesis in metaphysical terms as an imitation of the truth, rather than the truth itself. Plato argued that the natural world around us is only a partial copy of what is ultimately real, and thus an imitation of that world is nothing more than a copy of a copy, and therefore even further removed from the truth.

Aristotle, however, saw ultimate reality not in Plato's abstract Forms—timeless ideas such as Truth, Beauty, and Goodness—but in the world around us. And it is that world...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 334 words.)

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