Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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Irony In Great Expectations

What are 5 quotations of either verbal or dramatic irony in Great Expectations?

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While Charles Dickens's classic tale of maturation, Great Expectations, is replete with situational irony and satire, it also contains verbal and dramatic irony.

Verbal irony often involves surprising or amusing contradictions in the use and meanings of words. One example of verbal irony is Mrs. Joe's name for the device which she uses for disciplining Pip. "Tickler" is the name given to the piece of cane with which Mrs. Joe strikes Pip with rage. Ironically, Pip describes it as "wax-ended piece of cane, worn smooth by collision with my tickled frame" (ch.1). The phrase "tickled frame" is ironic since Pip is more than "tickled" by this instrument of harsh punishment. Whenever Mrs. Joe appears, Joe tries to hide Pip and protect him from a thrashing with this cruel tool.

Satis House is the name of the house belonging to Miss Havisham which was once a beautiful home with all the luxuries of the age. The word satis comes from the Latin word that means "enough." Ironically, it suggests that the...

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