The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

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What are the 5 major literary devices in "The Pit and the Pendulum"?

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Poe begins the story with an epigraph, though it is a faux epigraph, since he wrote it himself. An epigraph is a short quotation at the beginning of a literary work to suggest the work's theme. "The Pit and the Pendulum" begins with a Latin inscription Poe himself wrote as commentary on the fall of the French monarchy in the late 1790s, which Poe relates to the Spanish Inquisition in his story.

Poe chose the first person point of view of narration to tell the story. Using the first-person pronoun, "I," Poe pulls the reader into the story by creating intimacy with the person telling the story.

Poe makes use of sense imagery, creating sights, sounds, and sensations of the conditions in the dungeon where the narrator is being held.

Poe utilizes allusion  when he writes "And now, as I still continued to step cautiously onward, there came thronging upon my recollection a thousand vague rumors of the horrors of Toledo" to reference the horrors of the Spanish...

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