What are four language techniques used in Romeo and Juliet Act II, Scene 2: 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy.Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.What's a Montague? It is not hand or foot...

What are four language techniques used in Romeo and Juliet Act II, Scene 2:

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy.
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What's a Montague? It is not hand or foot not arm not face nor any other part
belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? That which we will call a rose
by any other name would smell as sweet
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo, doff thy name;
and for thy name, which is no part of thee,
take all myself.

Asked on by syu23

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In this passage from Act II, Scene 2 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, there is much beautiful language in this most poetic of plays. In addition, Juliet's soliloquy contains some rhetorical devices as she argues against hating Romeo, who has the name of her enemy.

Rhetorical questions - These are questions asked for effect, not particularly as a demand for an answer. For instance, "What's a Montague?" "What's in a name?"

Chiasmus - A rhetorical device in which the order of words in one phrase or clause is inverted in another in the same sentence.

So Romeo would, were he not Romeo...

Repetition - The use of words multiple times for effect. One such effect can be that of causing the listener to think more about the word. In this passage "name" is spoken four times.

                  ....O, be some other name!
What’s in a name?
Anaphora -  The repetition of a word at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, verses, etc.                  
It is not hand or foot not arm not face nor any other part...

Alliteration - The repetition of initial consonant sounds in a line, a technique that moves the line along rapidly. 

That which we call a rose                       (/w/ is repeated)
by any other name would smell as sweet       (/s/ is repeated)

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