Iago's Soliloquy

What are the four important soliloquies in Othello and what do they mean?

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Shakespeare makes extensive use of soliloquies in his plays to share the inner thoughts of his characters and to reveal crucial information with his audience. Through them, characters inform the audience by effectively talking to themselves and this drives the plot and develops character. In Othello, the audience knows that there is more than meets the eye in the character of Iago, and it is ironic that it is the honesty he displays in such words as "I am not what I am" (I.i.66), wrapped up in contradiction, which has the characters believing in him, oblivious to his wicked manipulation.

Important soliloquies include those mentioned in the previous answers - Act I, scene iii and Act II, scene i- wherein Iago's self-interest and misinterpretation of circumstances feed his obsession with revenge. They reveal Iago's intention to take advantage of Othello's "free and open nature" (I. iii. 393) and to use Cassio's obvious friendship with Desdemona to mislead Othello because Iago says, "I...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 815 words.)

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