In The Iliad, how does Hector's hubris lead to his fate?

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While Achilles is sulking in his tent, he angrily prays to Zeus for the destruction of the Achaeans—his own side! Zeus won't play ball, of course, because the gods' plan involves the Trojans being defeated. However, what he will do is make life hard for the Achaeans. And as Achilles's...

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While Achilles is sulking in his tent, he angrily prays to Zeus for the destruction of the Achaeans—his own side! Zeus won't play ball, of course, because the gods' plan involves the Trojans being defeated. However, what he will do is make life hard for the Achaeans. And as Achilles's comrades start getting slaughtered on the field of battle, Hector becomes overconfident, sensing that the tide is finally turning in the Trojans' favor. Essentially, what's happened is that a mediocre warrior has been artificially elevated to the status of a great hero by the intervention of the gods. It's not that Hector has become a great fighter all of a sudden; it's simply that Zeus has made his opponents weaker in (partial) response to Achilles's angry, heart-felt prayer.

Poor Hector has been lulled into a false sense of security, and this causes him to show signs of hubris. For instance, one could argue that he displays excessive pride in putting on the armor of the slain Patroclus. The fallen Greek warrior was Achilles's bosom buddy and his death causes Achilles to emerge from his grief-hole and enter the fray of battle. There he will punish Hector for his pride, and drag his broken corpse around the walls of Troy several times.

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The term “hubris” in ancient Greek, unlike in the popular (mis)use in 21st century English, is a legal term meaning something along the lines of aggravated assault. Hector himself is not really guilty of this. Hector does kill Patroclus, but that was under the command of Apollo. Achilles` mistreatment of the corpse of Hector can be seen an example of hubris, because while killing an enemy is a legitimate act in war, defiling the body of an honourable enemy was considered wrong.  The acts of Achilles and Agamemnon at the beginning of Iliad, where they seize the daughter of a priest as a war prize, angering Apollo can be considered acts of hubris; this confirms Apollo’s support of the Trojans, leading to his helping Hector kill Patroclus, which enrages Achilles, and causes Achilles to rejoin the battle and kill Hector.

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