What are three examples of each of the four freedoms being either expressed or denied in To Kill a MockingBird?The four freedoms are freedom of speech; freedom of every person to worship God in...

What are three examples of each of the four freedoms being either expressed or denied in To Kill a MockingBird?

The four freedoms are freedom of speech; freedom of every person to worship God in his or her own way; the freedom from want; and the freedom from fear.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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FREEDOM OF SPEECH.  I'm not sure there are many examples in the novel of a person's freedom of speech being denied. Certainly, Jem and Scout knew to hold their tongues in some instances, such as when they were being scolded by Atticus, Calpurnia or their Aunt Alexandra. Examples of speech being freely expressed are frequent.

  • B. B. Underwood's editorial in the local paper compared Tom's death with the "senseless slaughter of songbirds."
  • Atticus begs the jury to overlook their racial prejudice and judge Tom fairly.
  • Bob Ewell is allowed to tell his side of the story in the courtroom, even though it is inflammatory and it is apparent that he is lying.

FREEDOM OF WORSHIP.  Likewise, I don't recall any examples of the denial of free worship. Although it is almost certain that Maycomb's Negroes would not have been welcome in the town's all-white churches, the narrator never mentions this in the novel.

  • When Jem and Scout joined Cal at the First Purchase Church, they were confronted by Lula, who objected to the white children attending their church.
  • Boo's parents were known to be highly religious, but they chose to worship within the walls of their own house.
  • Miss Gates points out the injustices that Germany's Jewish population felt under Adolf Hitler.

FREEDOM FROM WANT.  Several examples arise during Scout's first day at school.

  • Walter Cunningham Jr. has no lunch or lunch money, nor can he pay back the money offered by Miss Caroline. Feeling sorry for him, Jem invites Walter to eat lunch at the Finch house.
  • Burris Ewell comes to school filthy and lice-ridden. He announces that he won't be back, signifying his father's total disregard for his children's welfare and education.
  • It can be argued that Boo Radley is forced by his family to remain inside their home, where he has no friends or other human contact. Even when Boo attempts to make friends with Jem and Scout via the secret knothole, Boo's brother cements the tree, effectively ending their relationship.

FREEDOM FROM FEAR.

  • Bob Ewell's ability to roam the town at will obviously worried Aunt Alexandra, though Atticus tried to downplay the depths of Bob's revenge.
  • School children feared Boo Radley, but Boo may have also feared others who misunderstood him.
  • Atticus feared that there would be an attempt to take Tom from the jail, and both he and Tom were lucky that the lynch mob left empty-handed.

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