What are 3 events that helped change Jem in the book To Kill A Mockingbird?  I have some ideas, here they are: Reading to Mrs. Dubose as punishment Telling Attictus when Dill showed up Crying...

What are 3 events that helped change Jem in the book To Kill A Mockingbird? 

I have some ideas, here they are:

  • Reading to Mrs. Dubose as punishment
  • Telling Attictus when Dill showed up
  • Crying after the knot-hole was filled in
  • The whole trial area is a period

I would very much appreciate the help. Thanks!

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Your examples are good ones, but there are more important events that changed Jem. 

First, witnessing the trial of Tom Robinson changed Jem in a fundamental way. If you recall, Jem (as well as Scout and Dill) was at the trial. Moreover, since Jem was the older of the three, he really understood what was going on. He was introduced to topics such as rape, physical abuse, and racism. 

Second, also related to the trial, when Tom Robinson lost the trial and a charge of guilty was given, Jem did not take it well. It left a scar, to be sure. He knew that the world was not a perfect place and that racism and injustice existed in his hometown. Here is what the text says:

It was Jem’s turn to cry. His face was streaked with angry tears as we made our way through the cheerful crowd. “It ain’t right,” he muttered, all the way to the corner of the square where we found Atticus waiting. Atticus was standing under the street light looking as though nothing had happened: his vest was buttoned, his collar and tie were neatly in place, his watch-chain glistened, he was his impassive self again.

“It ain’t right, Atticus,” said Jem. “No son, it’s not right.”

We walked home.

Third, another defining experience was when Bob Ewell tried to kill him and Scout. We can say that Jem experienced "evil" first hand. 

Finally, if we add another event, then I would say his friendship with Boo Radley. The person he and the other children were most afraid of wound up being a savior figure. 

Sources:

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