In 1984, what are some internal and external conflicts?

Expert Answers info

Colin Cavendish-Jones, Ph.D. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseCollege Professor, Lawyer

bookM.A. from Oxford University

bookPh.D. from St. Andrews University


calendarEducator since 2019

write1,660 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

In Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell continually shows that internal conflicts, personal feelings, and similar matters which might be private in other societies are rendered political by Totalitarianism. There are two ways to live. One is to love Big Brother and the Party to the exclusion of all else. In this way, romantic and sexual relationships become your "duty to the Party" to produce more Party members, while raising your children becomes an exercise in political orthodoxy. The other way is to rebel against the Party. There is no middle ground, since the Party requires total submission. The great external conflict of rebellion against the Party inevitably causes internal conflicts.

Two of Winston's most striking internal conflicts are his feelings about Julia and O'Brien . At the beginning of the book, before he has spoken to Julia, he hates her as aggressively as he desires her. His hatred is principally political, since he imagines that she is a typical orthodox, priggish member of the...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 935 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mrs-campbell eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2008

write2,159 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and Arts

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

accessteacher eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write13,728 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History

check Approved by eNotes Editorial