What do Macbeth and his wife plan to do to make sure the witches' prediction comes true in Macbeth by William Shakespeare?

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After Macbeth receives the seemingly favorable prophecy from the witches that he will one day be King of Scotland, he informs his wife, who calls upon evil spirits to consume her soul in order to devise a foolproof plan to assassinate King Duncan with impunity. Despite her husband's reluctance and...

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After Macbeth receives the seemingly favorable prophecy from the witches that he will one day be King of Scotland, he informs his wife, who calls upon evil spirits to consume her soul in order to devise a foolproof plan to assassinate King Duncan with impunity. Despite her husband's reluctance and hesitation, Lady Macbeth formulates a rather simple plan to kill the king. Lady Macbeth plans on drugging King Duncan's chamberlains, which will allow her husband the opportunity to carry out the assassination while King Duncan is sleeping. After killing Duncan, Macbeth will then smear the blood on the sleeping servants in order to blame the assassination on them.

However, things do not go exactly as planned. Macbeth exits Duncan's chamber in a fearful daze after committing regicide. He not only murders King Duncan but also stabs his servants to death and carries the bloody daggers out of the chamber. Lady Macbeth is then forced to take the daggers back into the chamber and smear Duncan's blood all over the servants. When the Scottish lords arrive, Macbeth and his wife blame the assassination on the deceased chamberlains, and Macbeth admits to killing Duncan's servants in a fit of rage. Macbeth and his wife initially get away with murder, but several notable characters are suspicious of the couple and suspect that Macbeth played a role in Duncan's death.

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In William Shakespeare's Macbeth, by the time Macbeth writes or talks to Lady Macbeth about the witches' three "predictions," two of them are already true and there is only one left: Macbeth will be king. It is indicative of the couple's greed and ambition that they are not content to let this prediction happen on its own; they insist on helping matters along and they do so immediately. 

Their plan--actually it is Lady Macbeth's plan--is to kill the current king, Duncan, while he is a guest in their home. Lady Macbeth will giet the king's guards drunk, Macbeth will kill Duncan, and they will blame the drunken guards for the deed. The plan seems so simple; however, it is not as easy as it sounds to accomplish this murder. 

First. Macbeth is not that interested. His wife has to browbeat and insult him into doing the deed.

Macbeth: We will proceed no further in this business....

Lady: Was the hope drunk
         Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since?          ...When you durst do it, then you were a man.

He is finally persuaded (bullied) into the plan, but even then, he cannot kill Duncan at first. He experiences a mirage with a bloody knife and feels extreme guilt just at the thought of committing the deed. He is finally forced to kill Duncan himself because Lady Macbeth, ironically, could not do it because Duncan looked too much like her father as he slept. Not only does Macbeth commit Duncan's murder, but he goes a little crazy and kills the two guards, as well. 

The suspicions begin almost immediately; however, Macbeth and his wife soon achieve their goal and, on a dark day for Scotland, are crowned as king and queen.

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