In the case below, were the babies switched? How do you know whether they were or they weren’t?It was suspected that two babies had been exchanged in a hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Jones received baby...

In the case below, were the babies switched? How do you know whether they were or they weren’t?

  1. It was suspected that two babies had been exchanged in a hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Jones received baby #1 and Mr. and Mrs. Simon received baby #2  Blood typing tests on the parents and the babies showed the following:

Mr. Jones: Type A

Mr. Simon: Type AB

Mrs. Jones: Type O

Mrs. Simons: Type O

Baby #1: Type A

Baby #2 Type O

 

 

Asked on by mlunar74

1 Answer | Add Yours

trophyhunter1's profile pic

trophyhunter1 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The alleles for A and B are codominant and the allele for O is recessive. In order to produce an individual who is type O, each parent must contribute an O allele. The only parents who could possibly do that is the Jones couple. That is because Mrs. Jones who is type O would supply one O allele and Mr. Jones, who is type A had to be heterozygous for type A meaning he has one A and one O allele in his genotype. He supplied the second O allele and the offspring was type O. The Simons couple could not be the parents of baby #2 since Mr. Simon can only contribute an A or B allele since he is type AB and could never produce an offspring with type O.

Therefore, the babies were accidentally switched at birth.

We’ve answered 318,916 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question