Wedding speeches - need helpHello, In July my brother his getting married and I found out I need to write a speech. Could anybody help me out? I got no clue what to write, haha. I'm a groomsman...

Wedding speeches - need help

Hello, In July my brother his getting married and I found out I need to write a speech.

Could anybody help me out? I got no clue what to write, haha.

I'm a groomsman if this helps.

 

Thanks, any help is greatly appreciated!

Asked on by jigjigpuff

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I have been to lots of weddings and some speeches have been terrific while others needed some work. I can also tell you that people do not like to hear overly long speeches.

First of all, depending on the size of the wedding there may be some people present who do not know who you are so introduce yourself.

Your speech (or toast) should also have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Start the speech out with a particular memory you have of your brother and his wife. Maybe it is a memory of how they met or their engagement. At the end of your speech, let the listeners know that it is the end by raising your glass and saying something like, "to the groom and his beautiful new bride" or something along those lines.

DO NOT talk about previous girlfriends in the speech, give your speech while drunk, or discuss money that may have been spent on the wedding.

Check out the link I posted below. There are some great suggestions! Good luck!

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

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