Ineed help finding a sentence with a metaphor in Fahrenheit 451 written by Ray Bradbury. It would be helpful to have the page number, but if not then its all right with just the sentences. It can...

Ineed help finding a sentence with a metaphor in Fahrenheit 451 written by Ray Bradbury. It would be helpful to have the page number, but if not then its all right with just the sentences. It can be from any part of the novel. Thank You for your help and time. :)

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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While locating metaphors can be a challenge sometimes, it is important to realize that people use these unstated comparisons often in everyday life. For instance, sportscasters often use them to describe the athletes of whatever game they are announcing. So, they speak a kind of subpoetry. For example, if a particular running back were breaking through the line and gaining much yardage nearly every time he was handed the football, an announcer might say something like, "What a tornado he is today, ripping and tearing through the defensive line!" The unstated comparison is between the football player and a tornado.

Metaphors may take one of four forms, as it depends upon whether the literal and figurative terms are respectively named or implied. In the example about the football player, both terms are named: tornado and he. But sometimes the literal term is named and the figurative term is implied, so these are harder to locate. For instance, in his poem "Harlem," Langston Hughes asks, "What happens to a dream deferred?" and he elaborates, asking if it festers or runs or stinks, etc. The last line "Or does it explode?" is a metaphor in which the dream is compared to a bomb that can explode, but "bomb" is not mentioned; instead, it is implied.

Here, then, sentences containing metaphors: 

On page 72 of the Simon and Schuster paperback, in Part I, Mildred discovers that Montag has a Bible and starts to scream, "You'll ruin us." Montag can imagine Beatty's voice telling him to sit down and watch how he lights one page at a time:

...Each becomes a black butterfly. Beautiful, eh? (In this unstated comparison between page and butterfly, the literal term is stated)

On page 106 of this same edition, Montag rides to a new assignment. 

The Salamander boomed to a halt, thowing men off in slips and clumsy hops. Montag stood fixing his raw eyes to the cold bright rail under his clenched fingers. (This metaphor compares Montag's eyes to raw flesh since they are so red. The comparison has the literal term-flesh-implied, rather than stated.)

Sources:
brsanders's profile pic

brsanders | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

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“The pains were spikes driven in the kneecap...” pg123

"He's a regular peppermint stick now, all sugar-crystal and saccharine...” pg 81

The page number depends on the edition you have. I listed the pages from my book.

iamkaori's profile picture

iamkaori | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 2) Salutatorian

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nozzle compared to great python:

With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.

face to crystal:

Her face, turned to him now, was fragile milk crystal.

Faber to Queen Bee, Montag to Drone

I'm the Queen Bee, safe in the hive. You will be the drone, the traveling ear.

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rashmika22's profile pic

rashmika22 | Student, Grade 8 | eNotes Newbie

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Thank you so much!

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