Was there resistance against the Group Areas Act of 1950?

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The Group Areas Act was a trio of acts passed by the South African Parliament in 1950 during the Apartheid era. The laws strengthened the segregation of blacks and whites in urban areas, forcing the black majority out of the well-developed city centers of Cape Town,...

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The Group Areas Act was a trio of acts passed by the South African Parliament in 1950 during the Apartheid era. The laws strengthened the segregation of blacks and whites in urban areas, forcing the black majority out of the well-developed city centers of Cape Town, Johannesburg, Durban, and other South African cities. This resulted in much hardship for black Africans, as their land was confiscated and their freedom of movement restricted.

There was sporadic, unorganized resistance to the passing of the Group Areas Act. The Indian and black African communities protested the bill around the country but were unable to unite forces due to simmering racial tensions between groups, particularly after the race-riots of 1949 in Durban. The restriction of movement, authoritarian nature of the Apartheid government and poverty combined to make it difficult for effective protest against the bill. Perhaps the most active resistance to the bill was the violent reactions many had to the forced removal from their land. Clashes between police and homeowners being forcibly evicted were often bloody. Although there was some opposition, the resistance against the Group Areas Act failed due to its fractured, disorganized nature.

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