Was King Henry VIII to blame for the English Revolution?

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Henry VIII obviously contributed to the eventual English Revolution by breaking away from the Catholic Church and forming the Church of England. However, he was no the sole cause. Several monarchs followed Henry, including Mary, who tried to return England to Catholicism. She was so unsuccessful they received the nickname...

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Henry VIII obviously contributed to the eventual English Revolution by breaking away from the Catholic Church and forming the Church of England. However, he was no the sole cause. Several monarchs followed Henry, including Mary, who tried to return England to Catholicism. She was so unsuccessful they received the nickname "Bloody Mary" for all the religious executions that took place. Her half-sister Elizabeth, had a more tolerant attitude and allowed both faiths to exist in her kingdom, as did James I. However, the Church of England failed to make many of the reforms Protestant, especially Puritans, wanted. In addition, Parliament demanded more and more power, something monarchs were reluctant to give up. So, by 1642,when Charles I was king, a combination of religious divisions and the struggle for power between Parliament and the Crown came to a head. This resulted in military conflict between the king and the Puritan Parliament. Eventually, Parliament won, abolished the monarchy only to restore it in 1660.

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