I was just wondering if this was an example of free indirect discourse in Pride and Prejudice?    "How differently did everything now appear in which he was concerned! His attentions to Miss King...

I was just wondering if this was an example of free indirect discourse in Pride and Prejudice? 

 

"How differently did everything now appear in which he was concerned! His attentions to Miss King were now the consequence of views solely and hatefully mercenary; and the mediocrity of her fortune proved no longer the moderation of his wishes, but his eagerness to grasp at anything. His behaviour to herself could now have had no tolerable motive; he had either been deceived with regard to her fortune, or had been gratifying his vanity by encouraging the preference which she believed she had most incautiously shewn. Every lingering struggle in his favour grew fainter and fainter; and in farther justification of Mr. Darcy, she could not but allow that Mr. Bingley, when questioned by Jane, had long ago asserted his blamelessness in the affair; that proud and repulsive as were his manners, she had never, in the whole course of their acquaintance -- an acquaintance which had latterly brought them much together, and given her a sort of intimacy with his ways -- seen anything that betrayed him to be unprincipled or unjust -- anything that spoke him of irreligious or immoral habits: that among his own connexions he was esteemed and valued -- that even Wickham had allowed him merit as a brother, and that she had often heard him speak so affectionately of his sister as to prove him capable of some amiable feeling; that had his actions been what Wickham represented them, so gross a violation of everything right could hardly have been concealed from the world; and that friendship between a person capable of it, and such an amiable man as Mr. Bingley, was incomprehensible." (chapter 36) 

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favoritethings eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Free indirect discourse refers to narration that technically originates with a third-person narrator; however, that speech sounds an awful lot like a particular character in the story.  To put it differently, free indirect discourse presents the thoughts and feelings and even voice of a character through the actual narration presented by that third-person narrator.  Therefore, yes, the passage you have quoted is an example of free indirect discourse because it is the speech of the novel's third-person narrator, but that speech sounds so very much like the voice of Elizabeth Bennet that one might be tempted to assume or to state that it is actually her speaking.  The major clue that she is not the speaker is that she is referred to with the third-person pronoun just as other characters are.

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