Was Jesus crucified on Mount Sinai?  Where was he taken after the Resurrection?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

All four of the gospel accounts of Jesus's life agree that he was crucified at Golgotha or Calvary, not Mount Sinai. Golgotha, which was probably just outside of the walls of Jerusalem, was called the "place of the skull." Some scholars say that the area received this name because it was located on a hill that looked like a human skull or skullcap. Others contend that it was named the "place of the skull" because it was an area of execution. In either case, it was where crucifixion, a gruesome form of execution, took place. Since the Romans used crucifixion both to punish and to deter crime, it makes sense that the site could be seen by passersby, as noted in both the gospels of Matthew and Mark. 

According to the gospel of John, 19:38-42, Jesus was buried by Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus in a new tomb where no corpse had ever lain. Following that, Jesus was resurrected, according to the Bible, and was on the earth for 40 days. He interacted with some of his disciples: notably, Thomas and Peter. After this time on earth, he was taken up in bodily form to heaven. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

Posted on

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Jesus was crucified at a place called Golgotha, or "the place of a skull." After his death, he was buried in a tomb belonging to Joseph of Arimithea. Golgotha is just outside the city gates of Jerusalem. Mt. Sinai is some distance from there in the Sinai Peninsula. It is the site where Moses received the Ten Commandments. There is no evidence that Jesus was anywhere near Mt. Sinai.

After his resurrection, Jesus was not "taken" anywhere. He apparently was seen by many, but travelled alone of his own free will. Forty days after his resurrection, he ascended into heaven, or was "taken up."

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

Posted on

Soaring plane image

We’ll help your grades soar

Start your 48-hour free trial and unlock all the summaries, Q&A, and analyses you need to get better grades now.

  • 30,000+ book summaries
  • 20% study tools discount
  • Ad-free content
  • PDF downloads
  • 300,000+ answers
  • 5-star customer support
Start your 48-Hour Free Trial