“I was going to do the washing, but we would run out of washing powder.” Shouldn't this be “but I thought we would”? The question is about “the future seen from the past” from my grammar...

“I was going to do the washing, but we would run out of washing powder.” Shouldn't this be “but I thought we would”?

The question is about “the future seen from the past” from my grammar book.

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Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The consideration of "the future seen from the past " isn't effected by the inclusion of a phrase indicating someone's mental contemplations. When standing alone, the clause "we would run out of washing powder" is an assertion: a positive statement given without corroborating fact. You can add, "I thought," making a speculative statement: conjectural thought. You can add, "I concluded," making a deductive statement: a conclusion based upon knowledge. You can also add "he thought" or "she concluded," or "they asserted." None of these affect the combined tenses used when speaking in the present of things that occurred in the past...

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