In Warriors Don't Cry, chapters 11–13, a public meeting was held and students could safely speak their minds about the integration. If you had a chance to speak at the meeting, what would you...

In Warriors Don't Cry, chapters 11–13, a public meeting was held and students could safely speak their minds about the integration. If you had a chance to speak at the meeting, what would you say?

In chapters 8–10, why did the black students and white students who supported integration have to act as if the hatred did not affect them?

 

Expert Answers
sciftw eNotes educator| Certified Educator

It appears that two different questions have been asked here.  The main Enotes question is an opinion question, so feel free to state whether or not you would speak at all at the meeting.  If you did choose to speak, decide whether or not you would tell the truth.  As long as you adequately defend your response, you are fine.  Personally, I wouldn't have spoken the truth, because it would have let the abusers know that their efforts were working.  That would give them satisfaction and pleasure for doing horrible things.  

As for the second question, there is the possibility that the black students said that the hatred doesn't bother them because it really doesn't bother them; however, I don't think the text supports that.  These students had explosives thrown at them, they were frequently beat, called horrible names, and had all kinds of food dumped on them.  There is no way that doesn't bother somebody.  I think the real reason is that the black students can't show that the harassment bothers them, because that would let the segregationists know that their actions were working.  Any outward show of fear would probably feed the frenzy and make things worse.  By outwardly showing bravery and indifference, there is a chance that the abusers will eventually grow tired of their efforts after enough time.