I want a second opinion on the importance of the development of plot, character and/or scene in A Midsummer Night's Dream in regard to the following quote.“And in the wood, where often you and...

I want a second opinion on the importance of the development of plot, character and/or scene in A Midsummer Night's Dream in regard to the following quote.

“And in the wood, where often you and I

upon faint primrose beds were wont to lie,

Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,

There my Lysander and myself shall meet;

And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,

To seek new friends and stranger companies.”

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durbanville | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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This quote is from Act I  Scene i

and contributes to the plot because Hermia and Lysander intend to elope and Hermia has just informed Helena of the fact. Hermia thinks Helena will be delighted as then Demetrius will not be able to pursue Hermia and can fall back in love with Helena.

and good luck grant thee thy Demetrius

To further develop the plot, this quote confirms the error of Demetrius' choices. Hermia is in love with Lysander and even though Demetrius 

courts Hermia, Helena’s close friend since childhood

she

will seek new friends and stranger companies

just to be with Lysander.

There is a recurring theme throughout as the characters fall in and out of love and even Theuseus

seems to choose the “wrong” person since he won Hippolyta by waging war on her.

The characters are also developed here as we see the purity of Hermia's spirit and her trusting nature.  We are also exposed to the strength of Hermia's convictions as she is prepared to risk the wrath of her father and a future  (purportedly)without purpose  

 since her father’s alternative punishment is banishment to a nunnery

Helena's scheming in order to win back Demetrius is introduced here. She is an obsessive character and instead of letting her friend elope and herself win back Demetrius thereafter, she tries to ensure her future by telling Demetrius. The plot develops as he then follows them in to the woods.

The whole confusion follows and Helena's obsession  further hampers her when she feels mocked by her friends.

 Interestingly, audiences struggled to identify who was whom in the play but this quote reveals

 the transformative power of love that makes four almost identical people seem so different and so wonderful in each other's eyes.

Refer to the eNotes study guide and navigate to the character analyses and so on to understand the development of the themes and characters.

 

  

Sources:

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