The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

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What are examples of dialogue that differentiate Dr. Jekyll from Mr. Hyde in Robert Louis Stevenson's novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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In the novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, there are quite a few instances of dialogue author Robert Louis Stevenson uses to show us that Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are two different people yet also the same person.

One of the best examples can be seen the first moment Mr. Utterson, Dr. Jekyll's lawyer, converses with Mr. Hyde. The novella opens with Mr. Enfield sharing a story with Mr. Utterson of Mr. Hyde being seen trampling a child and then agreeing to pay the child's family monetary compensation. After hearing the story, Mr. Utterson felt a strong urge to see Mr. Hyde. The reason behind his strong urge concerns the fact that Dr. Jekyll left in his possession a very strange will stating that, in the event of Dr. Jekyll's death, Dr. Jekyll would leave all of his possessions to Mr. Hyde, but if Dr. Jekyll should disappear, then Mr. Hyde should...

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