I want conduct a study on how schools and classrooms kill the creativity of a child, how they draw boundaries for children due to the way of teaching. I want to discuss why schools don't give...

I want conduct a study on how schools and classrooms kill the creativity of a child, how they draw boundaries for children due to the way of teaching. I want to discuss why schools don't give freedom to the children so they can nourish their own self image. Please guide me on the research topic.

Expert Answers
arqueille eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I would suggest that you investigate alternatives to the stultifying classroom and look at other educational theories and methods; a simple Google search may give you what you want.

Would you advocate homeschooling? It has its adherents.  How about charter schools? Montessori? Waldorf? Is your issue with public schools particularly? Do you find private schooling an appealing alternative? How about (Catholic) parochial schools? Would you be open to the "Schools Without Walls" model of alternative or experimental models?

Look at the various types of educational models that are currently available and decide which you find the most appealing. Or decide what your objectives are and see which alternative educational theories are in line with them. There are many theories and methods in use and one of them may appeal to you.

meganrhoads | Student

Dr. Maria Montessori's writing are definitely worth a look on this subject. She wrote extensively on how traditional education methods stifle children's natural inclination towards learning. Despite being written in the first half of the 20th century, her writings and criticisms are still very relevant to today's education system. E.M. Standing's book "Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work" is a good overview of her life, philosophy and method. I have found that the Montessori Philosophy is one of the most comprehensive when it comes to educating the whole child.

The education section of the Atlantic has several good articles, as does NPR. There are also several good Ted Talks about education and creativity. Ken Robinson has a great Ted Talk and book about the subject. The book is titled "The Element".

You might also look up John Holt. He wrote several books in the 60's and 70's discussing the shortcomings of traditional schooling. He eventually came to embrace homeschooling, and more specifically unschooling or deschooling, as the best alternative to traditional education.

Diane Ravitch has some interesting writings on education as well. She was originally a proponent of No Child Left Behind, but eventually became a very outspoken critic. She has a large body of work, dating back to the 1970's and is worth reading.