The Wanderer

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"The Wanderer" is an elegaic poem. Describe the scope of his lament.

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"The Wanderer," like another Anglo-Saxon elegy for a lost world, "The Seafarer," centers on the sadness of a man who has lost his lord, his friends, and his way of life as a pagan. It also depicts the consolation he feels in his new belief system founded on Christianity. In essence, the speaker is moving between two worlds, and he is clearly saddened to lose one but gladdened by the peace offered by the other.

The wanderer, even though he "finds himself grace, the mercy of the Lord" (l. 1a-1b), recounts (as the seafarer does in "The Seafarer") his sorrowful journey through life:

So I, very often wretched and sorrowful, having lost my homeland/ far from noble kinsman, having had to chain my innermost thoughts/. . . and wretched I from there/traveled in sorrow/over the frozen waves/ sought, sad because I have no hall,/ a giver of treasure. . . .(ll. 19a-25b)

Here, the wanderer's mind goes back to his pre-Christian life. He laments his loss of family, friends, and his lord ("giver of...

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