In what ways does Pablo experience alienation and prove his existentialism in the corrupt society? What does he currently believe in while with the others?

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Pablo experiences alienation from his prison mates by secluding himself with the thought of his execution hanging over him. He becomes more observant, detached, and less interactive with the only other humans around him as it gets closer and closer to his execution. Mentally, he doesn't find solace in any...

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Pablo experiences alienation from his prison mates by secluding himself with the thought of his execution hanging over him. He becomes more observant, detached, and less interactive with the only other humans around him as it gets closer and closer to his execution. Mentally, he doesn't find solace in any memories he has, even with those memories of loved ones. Those cherished memories are devalued. He begins to find no reason to live and no longer cares about his life. In the last day of interrogations, Pablo creates an elaborate lie to tell to his captors in order to 'secure' his freedom. His lie, in a turn of events, turns out to be truth and he is set free. In his situation, out of irony or strange fate, three 'free' individuals were taken captive without reason or cause. His 'freedom' is secured by a tall tale. Under the same conditions he was taken captive he was also released. This is the existential moment of the story. Truth did not cause his imprisonment nor release. Pablo believes that in his time in jail he did not know or understand anything. The story ends with him laughing at his experience and the lack of control he had over his own fate.

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Pablo believes in loyalty, and in his cause.  He decides not to give up Ramon, even though it will save him.  He lies instead.  The ironic part is that his lie turns out to be the truth, and Roman is captured.  Doing the right thing did not quite work out.

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