What is Virgil's view of the Romans and humanity in the Georgics book 1? 

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Virgil's poem Georgics is surprisingly existential for its time. It takes the theme of the futility of man in the midst of the fates of the world and the desires of the Gods. He spends a great deal of time elucidating the various labors and toils farmers go through...

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Virgil's poem Georgics is surprisingly existential for its time. It takes the theme of the futility of man in the midst of the fates of the world and the desires of the Gods. He spends a great deal of time elucidating the various labors and toils farmers go through after praying to the gods for success in their work. In spite of all of this, storms come and ruin all of their hard work. Set against all of this is a description of Caesar's assassination.

The view he presents is that ultimately, humans are only mortals and all their work is dependent on the Gods and there is little they can do to change their will. The Romans in particular, however, are portrayed as violent and warring as he spends a great deal of energy explaining their civil war. Being a Roman himself, this seems to come from a despair at the state of his civilization and a desire to see a more bountiful, harmonious society.

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This is a a difficult question, because the Georgics of Virgil are hard to understand. The end of book one describes the many portents that took place at the murder of Julius Caesar. If we take this as Virgil's view of humanity and the Romans, we can say that in many ways the Georgics has a bleak view of humanity. This is confirmed by the function of portents and the allusion Virgil makes to Hesiod's Works and Days

When it comes to portents and prodigies, the point is that the gods are not pleased with the behavior of people. A part of this is their morality. From Virgil's historical stand point this makes sense, as Rome has been ravaged (and the countryside) by civil conflict starting from Gracchi. 

When it comes to the allusion to Hesiod, we can say that there is a declension of man based on the passing of the ages. In a word, things get worse. 

With this said, we should also say that Virgil also believes that Octavian will be a savior figure. So, from this perspective, he is hopeful. 

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