In "Frankenstein," Victor feels that people are persecuting him because he believes that people can be brought back to life. Is this true? any quotations to use as evidence would be...

In "Frankenstein," Victor feels that people are persecuting him because he believes that people can be brought back to life. Is this true?

any quotations to use as evidence would be helpful

Expert Answers
timbrady eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There is some truth in this statement, but the larger truth relates to the general Romantic distrust of science's ability to really improve the human condition.  Science is essential neutral, without a specific moral posture.  The same science that brought us atomic power also brought us the atomic bomb.  Theoretic science tends to be more neutral; applied science (actually creating the being) often is not.  We have the same concerns about technology in our days.  Our ability to amass large amounts of information about all of us that could be used to improve our condition (medicine information, for example).  That same information in the wrong hands could be used with devastating consequences.  Cloning is another example of the positive/negative possibilities of science.  So Victor was treding in frightening areas.

The other problem Victor's research presents to the "people" in the novel, particuarly his family, is the isolation that his research drives him to.  He cuts himself off from the people who love him in the pursuit of this knowledge.  Trusting the head over the heart was another fear shared by all Romantics.

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Frankenstein

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