In The Veldt, what happens to George and Lydia? Why?

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Jamel Goldner eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The climax of Ray Bradbury's "The Veldt" is George and Lydia's death in the simulated African veldt within the nursery.  However, before they are trapped and killed by the machinations within the room, their conversations reveal that there are a lot of other things happening to them, and between them. 

The house that the family lives in is a state-of-the-art marvel.  There are motion-censor lights and doors, and the entire home is technologically advanced, even beyond our current time.  However, while the house is on the cutting edge, George and Lydia feel as if they are not.

Early in the short story, the parents have a conversation regarding the progress of society and technology and begin to open up to one another regarding Lydia's growing discontent.  She confides her belief that she isn't doing enough, and wishes to go back to a more domestic role within the family, as is shown in her conversation with George:

"Maybe I don't have enough to do. Maybe I have time to think too much....

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Michael Del Muro eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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