Using various adjectives, describe Bruno's character in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Inquisitive, curious, and so on.

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Sheltered: the son of a privileged Nazi family living in a big house in Berlin and later in comfortable circumstances next to Auschwitz, nine-year-old Bruno has had little opportunity or reason to question that the world is not a good place. For a nine year old, he has a weak grasp on the concept of evil, even while living in the heart of Nazi Germany. When he moves with his family to Auschwitz, he doesn't suspect how harsh life is on the other side of the barbed wire: he simply lacks a context for imagining what is going on there.

Friendly: Bruno, who is not close with his sister, is lonely after he leaves his best friends behind in Berlin. An innate friendliness and desire for companionship leads him to reach out to Shmuel, the boy in the striped pajamas. When he sneaks into the camp with him, disguised as an inmate, he never lets go of Shmuel's hand, a symbol of the bond that Bruno feels for the boy he innocently calls his "twin"—and whose twin he becomes in his final hours.

Compassionate: Bruno might not fully understand what is happening on the other side of the barbed wire, but he is, nevertheless, good to Shmuel. He brings him food and notices he is nevertheless getting thinner. He wants to help Shmuel find his father. Bruno may be the son of Nazi commandant, but he is not a participant in the brutality or cruelty of that regime.

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Innocent: Bruno's innocence is conveyed through his references to "the Fury" and "Out-With." He believes Shmuel's uniform is a pair of striped pajamas and cannot fathom how Shmuel lives with so many people in one small room. Bruno does not know what his father does as a soldier, only that Ralf wears an impressive uniform. Bruno's lack of knowledge on the true purpose of Auschwitz is ultimately what gets him killed; he enters the camp and puts on a uniform given to him by Shmuel, and they are both sent into a gas chamber.

Sensitive: Bruno gets upset when people like Lt. Kotler call him "little man," as he is short for his age. Bruno is sensitive to Shmuel's criticism of soldiers, as Bruno highly respects his father's job. After Pavel is punished by Lt. Kotler for spilling wine at dinner, Bruno is still emotionally unsettled as he lies in bed that night.

Brave: Bruno considers himself to be an explorer, and a key element of this role is to have the courage to venture into new territory. He offers to help Shmuel look for his father on the other side of the fence, crossing into the dangerous confines of Auschwitz concentration camp, where he is killed in a gas chamber.

Sensitive: Bruno gets upset when people like Lt. Kotler call him "little man," in reference to the fact that he is short for his age. Bruno is sensitive to Shmuel's criticism of soldiers, as Bruno highly respects his father's job. After Pavel is punished by Lt. Kotler for spilling wine at dinner, Bruno is still emotionally unsettled as he lies in bed that night.

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Naive. Bruno never truly comes to realize what's really going on at the camp. He's too young and too innocent to know about the Holocaust and the part his own father plays in it. He doesn't understand why Shmuel can't play with him like any regular boy, and why he's always wearing what look like striped pajamas. The world is very much like a gigantic playground to Bruno and everything he experiences in his life next door to the camp is understood by him in such terms.

Curious. As with any child of his age, Bruno wants to find out more about the world around him. The problem is that he's reliant on being allowed to do this by the adults in his life, and, for obvious reasons, they're completely unwilling. So although Bruno remains curious throughout the story, that curiosity is constantly thwarted by his parents, who think they're protecting him from a terrible truth. Only once does Bruno manage to break free from his parents' suffocating grip and that leads directly to his tragic demise.

Empathetic. Bruno brings Shmuel food; he helps him to find his father; and he listens to Shmuel, something that no one else will do. What Bruno lacks in understanding he more than makes up for in empathy. Yet it is a combination of his lack of his understanding, his chronic naivety, with his capacity for empathy that ultimately leads to his death.

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Adventurous: Throughout the novel, Bruno mentions that he wants to become an explorer when he grows up. He recalls going on various expeditions and exploring places at his old home in Berlin. When he arrives at Out-With, he is curious and longs to go on adventures to explore his new environment. Bruno finally gets his chance to be an "explorer" when he is asked to help find Shmuel's father. Tragically, Bruno's final expedition leads him to a gas chamber where he loses his life.

Polite: Bruno is a polite child who has strong morals and a conscious. He never interrupts adults when they are speaking, and does not mention sensitive subjects around his new friend out of fear that he will offend him. Bruno treats Maria, Pavel, and Shmuel with respect, despite the fact that many adults display contempt for them. He shows sympathy for Shmuel and regrets denying their friendship in front of Lieutenant Kotler. When he sees Shmuel following their precarious situation in the kitchen, he is quick to apologize for his actions.

Lonely: Bruno is lonely when he first arrives at Out-With. He continually mentions that he misses his old friends, and longs to play with Shmuel. Bruno tells Shmuel that he wishes he lived on the other side of the fence because there are other children who live there. In Bruno's mind, Shmuel is lucky because he is surrounded by so many kids.

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