Using UK contemporary issues regarding disability in the media, focus on the nature of named disability and clearly explain how people with disability are socially excluded in society.

Disabled people are socially excluded in UK society through their involvement in the media-created narrative that many disabled people who access state benefits are cheating the system.

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To answer this question, take a look at this study on UK disability inequality and exclusion, which was carried out by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in 2017. A reference link has been provided.

Remember that social exclusion means that a person is unable to access the basic rights and privileges of a society that are otherwise available to the majority. This definition is taken from the Poverty and Social Exclusion research project, shown in the second reference link.

Essentially, this report demonstrates that negative stereotyping in the media has caused disabled people to become socially excluded. Specifically, people who are disabled but may not have obvious physical symptoms of a disability face exclusion when they access state benefits and support. This is because the UK media has led a campaign against “scroungers” and phoneys who are falsely accessing these benefits. When disabled people are caught up in this hate campaign, they face harassment and prejudice, which often leads to feelings of isolation and stigmatization. In some cases, this may prevent disabled people from accessing financial support, which will then cause additional problems, like poverty and hardship.

Clearly, the media representation of disabled people needs to be broad and wide-ranging if it is to counter the myth that disabilities are always of a physical nature.

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