Using the TPCASTT method of analyzing poetry, annotate the poem "I Look at the World."

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TPCASTT is an acronym that stands for title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title, and theme.

When we first consider the title , "I look at the world," we might make the assumption that the narrator is speaking literally, as though he is simply looking at the world with his...

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TPCASTT is an acronym that stands for title, paraphrase, connotation, attitude, shift, title, and theme.

When we first consider the title, "I look at the world," we might make the assumption that the narrator is speaking literally, as though he is simply looking at the world with his eyes. However, we might also imagine that he is looking at the world in a more figurative sense, perhaps considering his place in it or noticing some aspect of the world that he has not noticed before.

A paraphrase of the poem might read like this: I look at the world, a black person becoming aware of how the world limits me. I see that oppression restricts my choices, just like walls would restrict the movements of my body, and I feel that these restrictions need to be destroyed. I see my body clearly now, and my hands that can build the world that exists inside my head. We, all who feel this way, need to hurry and find a way to make this world a reality.

Words that describe the world created by whites typically have negative connotations: words like "fenced-off," "narrow," and "assigned." The walls are "silly" and are associated with "oppression." The words that describe the black speaker and his feelings of empowerment are positive: he is "awakening," and he is "no longer blind," but capable of "mak[ing]" a new "world" with his "comrades."

I would define the speaker's attitude as empowered, capable, and strong. He believes in the strength and power of his body and that he can participate in the creation of a new world in which he will not be limited by others. A shift does occur at the beginning of the ninth line. Prior to this, the speaker has outlined what limits him and why, but in the ninth line, he begins to make a plan by deciding that he will tear down the oppressive "walls" that have confined him. The title, then, does signify the more figurative meaning, as the speaker is assessing his world and not simply looking at it with his eyes. Finally, the poem seems to convey the theme that those who suffer under oppression can overcome it when they work together.

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