Using the text narrative provided as a guide, please explain each category about how media literate citizens can create civic change in their communities. 1. Repositioning media literacies for...

Using the text narrative provided as a guide, please explain each category about how media literate citizens can create civic change in their communities.

1. Repositioning media literacies for spreadable connectivity: Normative approaches to critical inquiry that focus on a distanced critique of media messages is no longer sufficient in digital culture. Media literacy must focus on connecting humans, embracing differences, and finding a way to acknowledge but move past mainstream media as the point of entry for analysis.

 2. Repositioning media literacies as mechanisms for caring: When literacies are framed around responsible consumption, they tend to focus on the tools necessary to deconstruct messages but not on the ways in which this information can facilitate caring for one another. Media literacy would be well served by thinking more explicitly about how pedagogy and practice can be seen as relational and not individualistic, and focused on caring for and about, and not individual skill attainment.

 3. Repositioning media literacies as facilitators of “everyday” engagement: Imagining media literacy as active engagement allows the process to matter as much as the outcome. Research conducted by one of this article’s authors found that by focusing media literacy on critical skill attainment alone, young people were prone to be more cynical, less willing to engage in dialog, and less trustful of media and institutions in the first place (Mihailidis, 2009). Media literacies that focus on participation in local issues can frame the critique and creation of messages as connected to one’s sense of place, belonging, and community.

 4. Reimagining media literacies as intentionally civic: Last, media literacy as a movement has been constrained by a need to be apolitical. Much has been made about the need to teach about media’s role in society, and specifically about potentially harmful messages. These low-hanging fruits for media literacy, while relevant, perpetuate a frame of reference that sees problems as structural. Media literacy must focus on civic impact: The ways in which media can be used to impact, at realistic scale, the political, social, and cultural issues that define our democracy.

Expert Answers
jimjimjimmy eNotes educator| Certified Educator

1) Repositioning media literacies for spreadable connectivity: This category refers to the growing disillusionment among citizens in relation to mainstream media. Repositioning media entails the elimination of a centralized media structure, thereby allowing greater connectivity for the casual media consumer. 

2) Repositioning media literacies as mechanisms for caring: Instead of focusing on how media relates purely on an individual level, consumers should be encouraged to focus on how media can help citizens improve their social connections while eliminating their egocentric tendencies. 

3) Repositioning media literacies as facilitators of “everyday” engagement: This category strives to make media less depersonalized and more relevant. By personalizing media, consumers would not only be more willing to engage in media consumption, they would also be more likely to engage with their community in order to increase feelings of belonging and connectedness. 

4) Reimagining media literacies as intentionally civic: This category seeks to provide media that is not constrained by the necessity of being apolitical. As such, this category seeks to provide media aimed towards civic engagement, thereby allowing the average citizen to consume media that reflects their highly personalized and unique civic interests.