Using specific examples, how does the press act as a watch dog of the government. Using specific examples, how does the press act as a watch dog of the government.

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From a historical perspective in America, it all dates back to the Tammany Hall scandal with 'Boss' Tweed in the 1860s.  In that case, William Tweed's huge ring of political corruption and embezzlement of millions of taxpayers' dollars was outed by some lower level city officials who leaked it to the New York Times.  After the Times got a hold of the story and published a series of inflammatory articles along with some now very famous Thomas Nast cartoons, the nation turned against Tweed and his lackies, landing nearly all of them in jail. 

These days, with all of the cable news choices that we have, the press does more watchdogging than ever before. In fact, it's a little confusing to have so many differing opinions flying around.

It seems like every presidential administration has its issue that the press focuses on. Nixon had Watergate, Reagan had Iran-Contra, Clinton had Whitewater, and so on.

You can find controversial issues at local levels too, often involving some kind of...

(The entire section contains 9 answers and 932 words.)

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