Using EnglishThe adoption of a specific language reflects allegiance and positive valuation. Discuss how views on English are shaped by ideological, economic, positive and negative values.  

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I think most people view the spread of English as the spread of capitalism and other American ideals and aspects of American culture.
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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Negative spread:  I would argue that many countries resent the US because of the rapid spread of English.  Most Europeans who grow up speaking a native language other than English also learn English.  How many American children know two languages?  Though we require a foreign language class in high school (and most college programs) how many Americans become fluent in another language?

I think America has an international reputation of arrogance because we force everyone to learn "our" language but refuse to learn other languages.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The British writer of the twentieth century, George Orwell, stated that language does not reflect culture; it is culture.  When the French and English colonized Africa, for instance, they made French and English respectively the official languages, thus imposing their cultures upon the conquered people in their effort to make those people French or British citizens. And, when there was the Berlin Wall that separated West Germany from East Germany, which was under Communist occupation, the U.S.S.R. attempted to incorporate new words into the vocabulary of the East Germans in the effort to alienate them from their countrymen on the other side of the Wall.

Nothing separates people more than does language.  In the city of London before the vast immigration of contemporary times, there were certain dialects that identified people as from the various parts of the city.  The British upper classes would send their sons to Eton or to other such schools from which they would emerge with the accents and dialects and attitudes that would identify them from these schools.  So often social rankings were identified by the way the young men spoke.

The Victorian writer, Charles Dickens, wrote about how language identified people in his novel Great Expectations when Pip goes to play at Miss Havisham's and Estella ridicules Pip as "common" for calling "knaves" "jacks" and for wearing such "coarse boots."

There is little question that one's diction indicates the level at which one is educated, and it is usually a clue to one's socio-economic class and geographical area.

 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I went to high school in Hawaii where one's choice of language is almost an ideological statement in some ways.  If you speak "proper" English all the time, you identify yourself as an upper class person or someone who is striving to get to that class.  By contrast, if you speak Pidgin (also known as Hawaiian Creole English) in informal settings, you are identifying yourself as someone who is a "regular" local person.

In this type of situation, a person's choice of language is shaped by the image they want to present of themselves.

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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Choices within the varieties of English have significance; the writer identifies himself through his selection as an individual with a specific identity and as a group member

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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Discus  the spread of English has been viewed from positive and negative perspectives.

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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Thank you kindly  mwestwood

could you give me the source of this information

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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discuss   the impact of English as a tool of colonization: as a colonial legacy the English language substituted native languages

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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thank you Mr phunpie397

that about ideological but about other

Discuss how views on English are shaped by ideological, economic, positive and negative values.

 

could you discuss  The spread of English has been viewed from positive and negative perspectives.

kandysandy's profile pic

kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

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 This topic has to include the following main points:

-      The spread of English has been viewed from positive and negative perspectives.

-      The impact of English as a tool of colonization: as a colonial legacy the English language substituted native languages

-      Choices within the varieties of English have significance; the writer identifies himself through his selection as an individual with a specific identity and as a group member

-      The increasing role of English as a “global” language

-      Positive views associated with economic mobility, social rewards and financial gains

The conclusion should consider how using specific forms of English reflect allegiances, aspiration, or rejection.With examples

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