Using Creon's and Antigone's monologues in the play as examples, write an original monologue for this situation:Creon and Haimon have just argued about Creon's sentence against Antigone, and Haimon...

Using Creon's and Antigone's monologues in the play as examples, write an original monologue for this situation:

Creon and Haimon have just argued about Creon's sentence against Antigone, and Haimon has threatened his father with suicide if he goes through with killing Antigone - write for Creon or Haimon.

Asked on by broooooke

1 Answer | Add Yours

mstultz72's profile pic

mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Every character in Antigone (in the Oedipus trilogy, in fact) is stubborn, but for the good reasons.

In this case, Creon is stubborn in not making exceptions to family members when it comes to civil and capital law.  He certainly has the power and justification for his beliefs, but he stubbornly carries through with both when he is clearly warned by Antigone and Haemon (and the Chorus and Tieresias) that deaths will occur as a result.

Likewise, Haemon stubbornly treats his father, well, like his father.  He refuses to speak to him angrily, or even honestly.  As such, he speaks as a powerless underling who defers to Creon's age and role within the family.  This obviously weakens Heamon's position and bargaining power.

Here's the last conversation between the two:

HAEMON

Wert thou not my father, I would have called thee unwise.


CREON

Thou woman's slave, use not wheedling speech with me.


HAEMON

Thou wouldest speak, and then hear no reply?


CREON

Sayest thou so? Now, by the heaven above us-be sure of it-thou shalt smart for taunting me in this opprobrious strain. Bring forth that hated thing, that she may die forthwith in his presence-before his eyes-at her bridegroom's side!


HAEMON

No, not at my side-never think it-shall she perish; nor shalt thou ever set eyes more upon my face:-rave, then, with such friends as can endure thee.

Exit HAEMON

Here's what your assignment calls for, I think.  You have the chance, as Creon or Haemon, to not be stubborn and to save both the lives Haemon and Antigone.  In short, you have to write a monologue that is honest and devoid of pride.  It cannot be a pandering speech whose speaker is afraid of his audience; it must be forcefully written for an audience who has no choice but to heed its words.

 

We’ve answered 318,980 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question