Use 'GM (genetically modified) Crops' as an example of a scientific development and indicate briefly what the moral and ethical issues raised are?

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Another moral issue is that, if we have the power to increase a plant's resistance to disease, for example in such a way that more food is produced and hunger is alleviated, isn't there a moral imperative to do so? To use whatever technology is available to reduce human suffering?

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Another moral issue is that, if we have the power to increase a plant's resistance to disease, for example in such a way that more food is produced and hunger is alleviated, isn't there a moral imperative to do so? To use whatever technology is available to reduce human suffering?

Ethically, you can take the controversy surrounding Monsanto, a firm that genetically engineered corn seeds so that they would not reproduce seeds at the end of the life cycle of the plant, thus making small farmers, particularly in Latin America, dependent on buying the company's seeds year after year.  This is an example of genetically engineering plants for profit.

Scientifically in terms of ethics, messing with the natural makeup of plants and introducing essentially artificial or man made ones alters the balance of natural evolution.  It interferes with food chains and habitats in ways we do not understand, so if we cannot predict all the negative results of a crop modification, ethically, should we do it?

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The main moral and ethical issue raised by opponents of genetically modified plants and animals is that these organisms might prove to be unhealthy.  They think that they might somehow hurt people who consume them.  Alternately, they think that plants might end up cross breeding with other plants in ways that will be harmful.

The issue here is whether to take something that will help a lot of people and ban it because it might have harmful effects that are not now known.  This is a perennial question in science -- do we move quickly and help people now or move carefully so we do not inadvertantly harm them while trying to help?

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