In the United States, political leaders are elected to represent the American people. While presidents, governors, and legislators have political authority, their power comes directly from the...

In the United States, political leaders are elected to represent the American people. While presidents, governors, and legislators have political authority, their power comes directly from the citizens who vote for them. This political philosophy is most similar to which of these philosophers' beliefs?

  A. Thomas Hobbes   B. John Calvin   C. Voltaire   D. John Locke
emtheawesome | Student

This philosophy is most related to the ideas of John Locke. John Locke is considered to be the man who created the idea of modern democracy. He believed in the people choosing what to do, and many of his ideas were actually in the Constitution. The United States's democracy is losely based on John Locke's ideas. The consent of the people idea was also his, and he believed that "all men are created equal". I will give you more information with a link to a document.

gsenviro | Student

The representative form of government in the United States closely resembles the beliefs of John Locke (1632-1704). John Locke influenced American revolutionaries and his beliefs are reflected in the Declaration of Independence. He believed that all men are born equal and have equal rights, unlike the philosophy of monarchy, where someone is destined to be above everyone else. He supported the idea of government by the consent of the people and for the people and thus believed that any government that fails to take care of the interests of the people should be replaced. 

Thomas Hobbes was an absolutist and believed in the monarchy and considered it the best system of governance. In his book Leviathan he clearly supports the idea of the absolute vesting of power in a single individual, a monarch.

John Calvin developed "Calvinism," a christian theology system, and believed in the absolute sovereignty of God.

Voltaire also agreed with the idea of a monarch.