Under the Dawes Act of 1896, did the land allotment receipients have to be of full indian blood,ie: bothe mother and father being indian

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The Dawes Act was actually passed in 1887.   However, it was not until 1896 that the Dawes Commission gained enough power to actually follow through with the Act.  At that time, Native Americans who were considered "half-blood" tribal members were able to seek land claims. Thus, a person with...

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The Dawes Act was actually passed in 1887.   However, it was not until 1896 that the Dawes Commission gained enough power to actually follow through with the Act.  At that time, Native Americans who were considered "half-blood" tribal members were able to seek land claims. Thus, a person with a single Indian parent could receive an allotment of land.  However, any lower percentage of Indian blood was unacceptable until later modifications to the land-claim system.  The following link provides a means of searching all the claims submitted in 1896:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewyatt/1896%20Dawes%20Commission%20Index/1896%20Dawes%20Comm%20Index.html

 

 

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