Out of the seven propaganda techniques Ann McClintock explains in the article titled "Propaganda Techniques in Today's Advertising," which two are you most likely to be swayed by? Why? What is a...

Out of the seven propaganda techniques Ann McClintock explains in the article titled "Propaganda Techniques in Today's Advertising," which two are you most likely to be swayed by? Why? What is a present-day commercial you see as fitting those two techniques?

 

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Tamara K. H. | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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To complete your assignment, you want to first carefully review the seven different propaganda techniques Ann McClintock spells out in her article "Propaganda Techniques in Today's Advertising"; then, you want to think about which techniquea you personally feel more drawn toward.

For example, one may personally take pride in doing things contrarily to what others do. One might feel a general disdain for current pop culture trends, like valuing materialism, practicing loose sexual morality, and practicing feminist ideals to the extent that a woman's career is valued above family life. As a result, such a person may not be likely to submit to peer pressure as that person may more highly esteem his/her own principles, ethics, and values; hence, such a person may not be as likely to submit to the bandwagon technique. The bandwagon technique makes use of peer pressure to influence decisions. As McClintock states in her article, it specifically makes use of the "Everyone's doing it. Why don't you?" question. Such a technique works when "people have a deep desire not to be different"; however, it won't work when a person prides himself/herself in being different.

In contrast, while some people may not be swayed by peer pressure, they may be swayed by the testimonies of people they think they trust. Hence, a company or politician may be able to use the testimonial technique to move a person to make a decision when the bandwagon technique does not work. As McClintock phrases it, companies or other persuaders profit from the testimonial technique by making use of the "admiration people have for a celebrity to make the product shine more brightly." Even if a person may not be swayed by a celebrity endorsing a product simply because of the person's celebrity status, it's very easy to be swayed by what one thinks is another person's expertise on a product even if the person endorsing the product isn't really an expert. Hence, one could easily be swayed by the testimonial technique even if the person does not typically give into peer pressure.

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