The Twilight SagaAs teachers we constantly look for new ideas and interests to enhance our students to read and comprehend what they read. Since I have used the Twilight series as an example, it...

The Twilight Saga

As teachers we constantly look for new ideas and interests to enhance our students to read and comprehend what they read. Since I have used the Twilight series as an example, it has helped my students understand. For Example, the main characters, main idea, the who what when where how and why through the stories they love and apply the steps to the stories they have to read at school. They love it and so do I because I can reach their thinking process through Bella, Edward, or Jake. Through their actions I transfer it to the character in a reading story. We predict...that was a good one...who knew when Bella ran to Jake running from a wolf that Jake himself turns into one right before Bella's eyes! The same with their character in the story they are reading except not quite that exciting! It's fun teachers and it helps them. I would suggest Harry Potter, but too much debate on that one, however, I did let them read it if the parent allowed it. They love the AR Quiz on all of them. Just a thought....jm

 

Asked on by jmtgr1

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I try to keep up with what my students are reading too, and think that it's an excellent idea to use current young adult fiction to encourage reading, to teach literary devices, and to model writing style.  My students love Walter Dean Myers' books (author of Monster and Fallen Angels) and Sharon Draper's books such as Tears of a Tiger. It certainly helps if these books gain the national attention that the Twilight saga has achieved.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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It is encouraging to me to see books written that cause young readers to become excited to read. One the students I work with is a fourth grade special education student who has worked hard all summer and this school year to increase his reading ability enough that he can read Harry Potter books, first time he has ever been motivated tom read on his own. His parents recently told us that he has started reading it at home and is able to comprehend what he is reading with minimal assistance.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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It's always nice to keep abreast of what our young readers are reading. I personally enjoyed reading Cinda Williams Chima series, The Wizard Heir, The Warrior Heir, and The Dragon Heir(?). , Some of the things they read have a limited life. Harry Potter seems to be replaced by Twilight, and efore too long, some other series will come along. Teaching them to make the connections for themselves should help.

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booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

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Good point. I, too, enjoy finding resources that will stimulate kids' interest, allowing them to look at "academics" in new ways. With which grade level(s) are you using Twilight? And, out of curiosity, is there anyone who does NOT like the Twilight series and complains? I was amused to hear that a lot of high school freshman boys showed up at the premiere viewing.

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

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It is encouraging to me to see books written that cause young readers to become excited to read. One the students I work with is a fourth grade special education student who has worked hard all summer and this school year to increase his reading ability enough that he can read Harry Potter books, first time he has ever been motivated tom read on his own. His parents recently told us that he has started reading it at home and is able to comprehend what he is reading with minimal assistance.

Good for you! The child wants to read the book Harry Potter because it is not your usual predictable story. To me a book like that is like walking into a candy shop made of rich candies and sweets not knowing which one to bite first..ha...really....jm

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

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I try to keep up with what my students are reading too, and think that it's an excellent idea to use current young adult fiction to encourage reading, to teach literary devices, and to model writing style.  My students love Walter Dean Myers' books (author of Monster and Fallen Angels) and Sharon Draper's books such as Tears of a Tiger. It certainly helps if these books gain the national attention that the Twilight saga has achieved.

Exactly! Once they start to read and comprehend, even if it is the Twilight or Harry Potter Books, we as teachers can lead the way to the books we really want them to read, for example, David Copperfield, Of Mice and Men   etc......jm

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

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The Twilight saga could be a wonderful starting point in the analysis of plot, theme, characterization, narration, symbolism, etc. Then you could move on to more demanding works. The fact that they are so popular is a good indication that people are reading; what they read doesn't really matter.

You are so right! If you notice, the first book and movie were gentle....like walking steps to reading and writing. New Moon was more detailed pulling the reader into a more complex situation between the love and passion of three main characters who had to make choices. As for "what they read really doesn't matter"......well...yes it does sweetie because I once had a Professor who ask "What books have you read recently?" and this woman raised her hand and said "National Enquirer" and she was asked to leave the room. Teachers can be funny sometimes, however, we could not do that to our kids, ask them to leave, but we can monitor what they read......jm

Have A Great Day!

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted on

It's always nice to keep abreast of what our young readers are reading. I personally enjoyed reading Cinda Williams Chima series, The Wizard Heir, The Warrior Heir, and The Dragon Heir(?). , Some of the things they read have a limited life. Harry Potter seems to be replaced by Twilight, and efore too long, some other series will come along. Teaching them to make the connections for themselves should help.

I agree 100% with what you do. The kids I teach would not even know about those books. Everyday I introduce them to the old and the new. Books like Harry Potter and Twilight open that door for me. It is hard to teach kids today. Their world is so different from the one I was brought up in. I want them to enjoy their education while learning at the same time.....jm

Have A Great Day!

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jmtgr1 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted on

Good point. I, too, enjoy finding resources that will stimulate kids' interest, allowing them to look at "academics" in new ways. With which grade level(s) are you using Twilight? And, out of curiosity, is there anyone who does NOT like the Twilight series and complains? I was amused to hear that a lot of high school freshman boys showed up at the premiere viewing.

I use examples with my 4th graders. 99% like it. Of course there is always a few % that will not like something.

The boys show up because they "want" that power of Edward and learn the strong and swift movements of Jacob. Really....I had a student flying around the room quickly picking up papers etc....I asked him what was he doing and he said "I am Edward...quick and fast!" My girls...they want to be Bella! I love it!....jm

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

The Twilight saga could be a wonderful starting point in the analysis of plot, theme, characterization, narration, symbolism, etc. Then you could move on to more demanding works. The fact that they are so popular is a good indication that people are reading; what they read doesn't really matter.

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