In Tuck Everlasting, compare and contrast the Tucks' house and the Fosters'.  Which does Winnie prefer? 

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Although the Tucks' house and the Fosters' house have many obvious differences, they do have a few similarities.

First, regarding similarities, both are isolated and relatively off-limits to visitors. The Fosters' home is a "touch-me-not cottage" that sends the message to passersby: "Move on—we don't want you here." To reach the Tucks' well-concealed "homely little house," Winnie must travel for a long time over hills and through the forest. When the man in the yellow suit knocks on the Tucks' door, it startles them because it is "such an alien sound." Both homes have two stories with bedrooms upstairs.

The biggest difference between the two houses is the orderliness. The Fosters' house is kept spotless by Winnie's mother and grandmother. They sweep and mop regularly to keep dirt away. In contrast, the Tucks' house features "gentle eddies of dust," "silver cobwebs," and a mouse. Dishes are stacked in the sink, and every surface and wall is covered with some item. "Evidence of their...

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