As a measure of the strength of metallic bonding, the boiling point of a metal is a better indicator than its melting point. True or False?  A single covalent bond consists of a single...

As a measure of the strength of metallic bonding, the boiling point of a metal is a better indicator than its melting point. True or False?

 

A single covalent bond consists of a single delocalized electron pair.

Asked on by jchan77

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enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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Metallic bonds occur within a molecule between a positively charged metallic atom and the mobile electrons.  This type of bonding occurs over the whole molecular structure, rather than being localized between neighboring (or near-neighboring) atoms and electrons. Since the electrons are moving about the whole of the metal molecule, rather than specifically around a given atom, they are said to be delocalized electrons.

Now when a metal melts,  the bond between atoms that make up the molecule are loosened, but not broken.  The delocalized electrons become even more delocalized, moving in an expanding cloud as the metal transitions from solid to liquid.  The metallic bond finally breaks when the metal transitions from liquid to gas, when it boils.  Where that bond breaks indicates the strength of the bond, so your supposition is True.

 

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