Trovald and Nora's diffrent points of view about money .Discuss it .

2 Answers | Add Yours

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Here is the answer with some more elaboration to make 40+ lines:

It would seem that Nora perceives money as a means to an end while Trovald views money as an end in itself; for, he is irrationally frugal himself and scolds his wife for her spendthrift ways. From the inception of the play, their differences are apparent. When, for instance, Nora suggests that it "the first Christmas we can be a little extravagant," her husband retorts,"I don't know about that. We certainly don't have money to waste." Further, he tells her, "A home in debt isn't a free home, and if it isn't free it isn't beautiful."

Their differences in perspective on the subject of money are certainly apparent in Act I as Nora wants to spend money at Christmas so that the family can truly enjoy the holiday season without sacrifice as in past years while her husband finds such spending, even for the joy of his children, frivolous. Further, Nora's attitude about spending more for the holidays is the same attitude that she has exhibited in her pivotal act of furtive forgery and the obtaining of a loan in the sum of twelve hundred dollars in order that her husband would be able to recover in the warm climate of Italy from a dangerous illness. It is this deception, then, that becomes the instrument of the decisive conflict in Ibsen's play.

Because he has always been so unreasonably thrifty and would never have borrowed or spent such money on himself, Nora has been driven, out of love for her husband, to take drastic measures. After doing so, she then has had to secretly repay the loan from Krogstad by copying documents or saving money from her household budget. This clandestine behavior of Nora's, of course, has an affect upon her relationship with her husband as her furtive behavior extends itself into hiding such meaningless things as macaroons. Moreover, Nora subjugates herself to her husband in order to keep him content and with suspicion of her activities. She also seeks friendship with the boarder, Dr. Rank. When her old friend, Mrs. Linde, arrives Nora's relationship with her is compromised by the involvement she has with Krogstad, a former suitor of Mrs. Linde.

When her husband learns of Nora's past actions, his reaction reveals no appreciation for what she has done; instead, he reacts in a petty, selfish and unfeeling manner as he berates Nora for her deception, displaying no gratitude for her sacrifices for his health. His main concern is the disgrace that she has brought upon him with her involvement with Krogstad, whom Torvald sees as a "shabby scrivener." For Torvald, their home to no longer be "beautiful" as he has said in Act I because he feels betrayed rather than loved by Nora. When she tells him why she acted as she did--"I have loved you more than anything else in the whole world--Torvald reacts in a supercilious manner:

"Oh, don't give me any silly excuses....You have ruined all my happiness. My whole future--that's what you have destroyed....You have loved me the way a wife ought to lover he husband. You just didn't have the wisdom to judge the means.

The main focus for Torvald is Nora's prodigality with money; her focus has been to heal her husband and keep her family in tact no matter the ethical compromises she has had to make.

Sources:
mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

It would seem that Nora perceives money as a means to an end while Trovald views money as an end in itself; for, he is irrationally frugal and scolds his wife for her spendthrift ways. From the inception of the play, their differences are apparent. When, for instance, Nora suggests that during "the first Christmas we can be a little extravagant," her husband retorts,"I don't know about that. We certainly don't have money to waste." Further, he tells her, "A home in debt isn't a free home, and if it isn't free it isn't beautiful."

Their differences in perspective on the subject of money are certainly apparent. Nora wants to spend money at Christmas so that the family can truly enjoy the holiday season without sacrifice as in past years. This is the same attitude that she has exhibited in her pivotal act of furtive forgery and the obtaining of a loan in the sum of four thousand eight hundred crowns so that her husband would be able to recover in the warm climate of Italy from a dangerous illness. 

When her husband learns of Nora's past actions, his reaction reveals no appreciation for what she has done; instead, he reacts in a petty, selfish and unfeeling manner as he berates Nora, displaying no gratitude for her sacrifices for his health. His main concern is the disgrace that he has brought upon him, causing their home to no longer be "beautiful" as he has said in Act I. He feels betrayed rather than loved by Nora. When she tells him why she acted as she did--"I have loved you more than anything else in the whole world--Torvald reacts in a supercilious manner:

"Oh, don't give me any silly excuses....You have ruined all my happiness. My whole future--that's what you have destroyed....You have loved me the way a wife ought to love her husband. You just didn't have the wisdom to judge the means.

The main focus for Torvald is Nora' prodigality with money; her focus has been to heal her husband and keep her family in tact.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,946 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question