Trifles Questions and Answers
by Susan Glaspell

Trifles book cover
Start Your Free Trial

In "Trifles", what are the different types of figurative language used?

Expert Answers info

juergems eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2017

write180 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

To build off of the previous answer, Susan Glaspell does not use a lot of figurative language within her one-act play, Trifles. This is because she so precisely uses one moment of figurative language to build up symbolism, that she really doesn't need anything else.

I am, of course, referring to Mrs. Hale using a simile that compares Mrs. Wright to a bird, which goes as such:

She—come to think of it, she was kind of like a bird herself—real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid and—fluttery. How—she—did—change.

After marrying John Wright, Minnie Foster became Mrs. Wright. She did not have any children, it seems that she did not have many friends because her home was not welcoming, and Mrs. Hale tells Mrs. Peters that John was "a hard man." Here we see the idea behind the simile: Mrs. Wright was like a bird, once flying freely, who had become caged. Mrs. Hale even says that Mrs. Wright used to...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 508 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

dalepowell1962 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write130 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and Science

check Approved by eNotes Editorial