The Destructors Questions and Answers
by Graham Greene

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How does Trevor show that he is different from the other boys in the story "The Destructors"?

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Trevor, the main character in Graham Greene’s short story “The Destructors,” displays his distinctiveness from the rest of the members of the Wormsley Common gang through his almost psychologically disturbing demeanor. While the rest of the boys, initially led by Blackie, are prototypical boys, naïve, a little naughty but essentially harmless, there is something about Trevor, or T., that sets him apart. Graham’s omniscient narrator describes this newcomer to the gang as possessed of a “brooding silence that all recognized,” noting that T. “never wasted a word even to tell his name until it was required of him by the rules.” While Blackie commands a certain degree of respect by virtue of his role as leader of the gang, until his position is usurped by T., it is Trevor who ascends to the role of leader through those very qualities that define him. Note how Mike, the gang’s nine-year-old simpleton, responds to his first introduction to the newcomer’s formal name:

When he...

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