A tragic hero must evoke in the audience a sense of pity and fear. How does this relate to Othello?

Expert Answers info

Blaze Bergstrom eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2018

write4,250 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Othello evokes the audience's pity and fear—among other emotions—at various points in the play. It is soon apparent that Othello is more comfortable in his role as a military leader than as a husband.

Paradoxically, one reason the audience might pity him is for the high price of his success. Othello has many subordinates from whom he expects loyalty, but he has no friends. That is one reason why his relationship with Desdemona occupies such a large portion of his emotional life. Unaware of Iago's pathological envy, he has no reason to suspect him of betrayal.

As the audience is privy to Iago's plotting, they suspect that he will succeed in twisting Othello's mind. The pity we feel for Othello's isolation and victimization turns into...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 398 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

litgeek2015 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2015

write379 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial