Questions and Answers for Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

Catherine and Heathcliff can't be together because Catherine has decided Heathcliff is too socially degraded to marry. Hindley, who has become the family patriarch since his father died, has turned...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 11:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The careful, exacting scrutiny of the text characteristic of New Criticism, which was popular in the conservative era of the mid-twentieth century, certainly mitigates readers' emotional responses...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2013 1:25 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

One important influence Wuthering Heights has had on modern fiction is in its unrelenting depiction of family dysfunction. While the Victorian novel tended to strongly idealize the nuclear family...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2019 1:15 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights has more than two narrators, if we include, for example, Catherine's diary entries and Isabella's letters, but the two main narrators are Lockwood and Nelly Dean. Bronte chose Mr....

Latest answer posted November 5, 2017 11:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

It's only six months since Catherine got hitched to Edgar, yet their marriage is already starting to go south. Enter Heathcliff to make things even worse. When he unexpectedly shows up at...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2019 6:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

When studying Gothic literature, one of the key elements to look at regarding setting is the buildings. Gothic literature has an architectural focus, so creepy houses, set apart from villages and...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2019 1:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In his book of essays on nineteenth-century fiction Is Heathcliff a Murderer?, John Sutherland comments, When he returns to Wuthering Heights after his mysterious three-year period of exile...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 12:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

What makes Wuthering Heights such an outstanding work of fiction is its blend of concreteness with abstraction. For instance, the familiar narration of Nelly who provides dates and exact details...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2010 3:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

When Catherine is a child, she is lively, spoiled, strong-willed. At first, she resents Heathcliff when her father brings him home and both she and her brother refuse to have anything to do with...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2010 10:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The symbols and motifs are mainly Gothic and Freudian (Penistone Crag): haunted houses ruined buildings shadows, a beam of moonlight in the blackness, a flickering candle, or the only...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2010 1:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Catherine and Heathcliff grew up together and enjoyed each other’s company. They grew closer and closer as they grew, but when Catherine is bitten by the Linton’s guard dog and must recuperate at...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2010 10:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff vows revenge on both Hindley Earnshaw and Edgar Linton. He seeks revenge against Hindley for treating Heathcliff like a servant and humiliating him...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2015 7:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In addition to the elements already mentioned, there are other elements of the Gothic and Dark Romanticism in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights: Bleak, foreboding environments In the opening...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2016 7:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The character of Heathcliff in Emily Bronte's classic Wuthering Heights could be considered a realistic character with a deep and disturbing set of complexes that transformed him negatively. Yet,...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2011 5:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff wants revenge so badly that he's willing to destroy everyone at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff cruelly uses Hareton, Catherine, and Linton, his own son, to get his...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2007 1:51 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In Charlotte Bronte's Romantic tale, the wuthering heights, as described by Mr. Lockwood, become an elemental force, a Gothic force as it is associated with preternatural states. In Chapter I, for...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2013 7:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

This is a difficult issue in this novel, because I believe that Bronte tantalises us by giving us enough evidence to suggest that Heathcliff's madness in later life is due to the cruelty he endured...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2011 8:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

see http://www.enotes.com/wuthering-heights/q-and-a/what-role-marriage-wuthering-heights-318240 http://www.enotes.com/wuthering-heights/q-and-a/what-role-marriage-wuthering-heights-310743

Latest answer posted March 10, 2012 5:08 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Marriage in this novel is presented in different ways depending on the different generations of the characters. For both Cathy and Heathcliff, unfortunately marriage is used as a means to an end...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2013 5:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights was Emily Brontë’s only novel, so we cannot compare the literary devices in this novel to her other writings. However, giving her characters similar names was clearly an...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2018 2:42 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Near the end of the book, Heathcliff explains to Nelly Dean why he has given up on revenge. As he notes, the young Cathy and Hareton are in his clutches, and he could exact revenge on the Linton...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 11:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Joseph is an older man who is employed by the residents at Wuthering Heights as a servant. The family gives him much freedom, and often he chooses not to work very hard at all, like in this scene...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2019 10:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Although she has inherited some of the caprice and headstrong tendencies of her mother, Catherine Linton demonstrates a tenderness and solicitude toward others not seen in her mother, qualities...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2015 7:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

I am assuming you might be looking for themes that are similar in both works. In Wuthering Heights, there is the theme of love, revenge, violence and cruelty and class conflict. In Great...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2010 12:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Bronte creates a mood of suspense and impending doom from the beginning of chapter 3 by describing the room. At the beginning of chapter 3, we get hints that something terrible has happened in...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2013 8:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

I suggest you explore “The Forest of Rhetoric” for definitions and examples of rhetorical choices. As far as identifying examples in Wuthering Heights specifically, begin looking for the more...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2010 6:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Social convention plays a major antagonistic role in Wuthering Heights. Catherine Earnshaw is, by nature, a wild personality. She loves being outdoors, playing rough, and being rather nasty....

Latest answer posted April 20, 2019 4:16 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Yes, Heathcliff is nasty, and it does seem odd that Linton would stop writing to Cathy, but several things happened. First of all, don't forget that Linton was very sickly and did not have much...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2010 4:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Nelly's narration of the death of her master, Mr. Earnshaw, is moving and poignant in a number of ways, and stylistically Bronte uses a number of devices to highlight the significance of this...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2013 7:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Very good question, as it penetrates to the very heart of the crux of this fascinating novel. Heathcliff is what is called a Byronic hero, a term used to describe a Romantic hero who was brooding,...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2009 10:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The animal imagery used by Bronte in Wuthering Heights offers more for the motif of the influence of the forces of a nature upon the plot as well as an insight into the characters. For instance,...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2011 6:48 pm UTC

6 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

In the novel 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte, the behavior of the dogs towards Lockwood foreshadows ' the touching of the past ' that Lockwood intends to do. He may not ne about to rummage...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2010 5:17 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

The answer to this excellent question can be found in Chapter Nine of this excellent novel. This is of course the pivotal scene when Catherine declares her love for Heathcliff but also tells Nelly...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2012 2:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights was written at a time when women's rights as we now know them were virtually non-existent. Women were consigned to a subordinate role in society, expected at all times to defer to...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2019 2:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

The Romantics believed in the Classical concept of nature. The natural world is like the Garden of Eden: a paradise, uncorrupted by mankind, the perfect synthesis of the divine, human, and...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2010 3:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

There are only two families in this story, the Earnshaws and the Lintons. The Earnshaws had two children, Hindley and Catherine, and they took in Heathcliff, a homeless waif. The Lintons had two...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2013 5:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The Romantic elements of this novel are easy to identify: the windswept moors where passions blow just as strong as the elements, the brooding characters and the close connection to nature...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2012 7:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The sites listed below should help you answer your question. "Feminism" means advocating for women's rights. These rights could be political, social or economic. A "Feminist" believes and...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2011 8:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff and Catherine's last meeting on Catherine's deathbed has a lot of important dialogue in this regard. It takes place in chapter 15 and Catherine tells Heathcliff that loving him has...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2008 9:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Catherine's quote, "I am Heathcliff" in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is used to define not only the relationship of the characters, but also the relationship's effect on Catherine. Catherine...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2009 4:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The principle use of dialect is the title itself: Wuthering Heights. In the text Brontë tells us that "wuthering" is a word from the local dialect that describes the violent storm weather that...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 8:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

For all his roughness of birth in the novel 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte - Heathcliffe has the intelligence of the oppressed, the watchfulness of the exploited - he has learned like many...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2009 2:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

I am not going to answer your question completely, but one of the central debates within Wuthering Heights is the nature of Heathcliffe as a character. In particular, there is a dichotomy between...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2009 2:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff is an orphan, dark-skinned, passionate, violent, emotional, raw, extreme in rage and love. Edgar is privileged, pale, bookish, cowardly, meek, tender, womanly. Regarding Edgar,...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2010 10:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Cathy says the only reason she even considered marrying Linton was to help Heathcliff. She explains to Nelly Dean that she can't marry Heathcliff now, despite her deep love for him, because Hindley...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2019 12:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

At the end of the novel, we read: The following evening was very wet: indeed, it poured down till day-dawn; and, as I took my morning walk round the house, I observed the master's window swinging...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2010 1:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte's classic, Wuthering Heights, is a novel that contains much imagery and figurative language that matches the passionate characters and untamed setting. Surely, readers will have no...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2010 11:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

When Isabella dies, her wish is that Linton be raised by Edgar in Thrushcross Grange. When Linton arrives, Cathy is very happy to meet him and is very friendly towards him. However, Heathcliff is...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2008 9:51 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Close reading simply means you read the chosen passage one sentence and/or word at a time—stopping to contemplate small fragments of the whole text. The whole paragraph that your section is...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2019 10:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Indeed, there is a contradiction in Catherine's character. Having avowed in Chapter 9 that she loves Heathcliff, their souls are alike, and she is only happy with Heathcliff--"Nelly, I am...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2013 12:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

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