Questions and Answers for Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

For all the pain in this novel, it does have a happy ending. Heathcliff and Catherine's love ends tragically with her early death, but the next generation rights the wrongs of the past. Heathcliff...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2020 11:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights as a poor stable-lad and returns three years later as a wealthy gentleman. It is never explained what he did during this time or how he made his money, and the...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2020 12:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte, is a sad, haunting tale of Heathcliff, his love for Catherine, and his inability to find true happiness. The story takes place in Yorkshire, and is a completely...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2010 3:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff embarrasses Hareton most by continuing to raise him in the fashion of his revenge. He is determined to treat Hareton, the son of Hindley, worse then he was treated by Hindley. Hareton...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2012 11:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Nelly is certainly not reliable. She makes her dislike of Catherine quite clear and even when Catherine does deserve some sympathy (such as when she's worried about her decision to marry Edgar...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2018 2:53 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

A metaphysical novel that separates and intertwines the wild and the tame, the intellectual and the passionate, the old and the young, the refined and the rustic, Wuthering Heights contains several...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2013 8:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

In her critical essay, "The Waif at the Window: Emily Brontë's Feminine 'Bildungsroman,'" Annette R. Federico writes, ...in terms of the first generation, Wuthering Heights is not a Bildungsroman...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 5:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is both of its time and sui generis—one of a kind. It is quite different in tone from the novels of Dickens, for instance, and of most Victorians, including other women authors...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2020 1:26 am UTC

3 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff is driven by a need for vengeance, not just against Hindley or the Lintons, but against an entire social order that seeks to exclude him. Heathcliff embraces his otherness, and in fact...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2018 12:57 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Catherine and Heathcliff grow up as neglected and, in Heathcliff's case, abused children. They are left orphaned when their father (Heathcliff's stepfather) dies. Their guardian, Catherine's older...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2018 12:19 am UTC

3 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

It is indeed ironic that Heathcliff should be regarded as the epitome of barbarism—of all that is wild, impulsive, and savage—when it is the supposedly respectable Hindley Earnshaw who behaves...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2019 7:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

It may appear to readers that Heathcliff does indeed kill himself, albeit in a highly unusual manner. However, this is not explicitly stated in the novel, so there is no way to know for sure...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 11:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

It can be hard to summarize the "message" of Wuthering Heights. The meaning of a novel such as this is often as dependent on the person doing the reading and the circumstances in which it is read...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 11:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Isabella Linton, of Thrushcross Grange, is the sister of Edgar Linton; the man who will become Catherine Earnshaw's husband, much to Heathcliff's chagrin. Isabella is a lady. She is brought up in a...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 6:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Having settled himself in the "clothespress," Lockwood discovers the diaries of Catherine Earnshaw and is amused by her caricature of Joseph, crudely drawn, but accurate in its depiction of the...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2013 7:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Published in 1847, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights is a romantic novel with intricate ties to the idea of nature and the sublime. Developed through Romantic artists and poets, the idea of sublime...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2019 5:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is a prime example of the Gothic romance genre. As stated above, the presence of the supernatural, isolated settings, and the drama surrounding the characters'...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2018 4:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

We have no record as to why Emily Bronte chose the narrators she did. If we work backwards, however, it is clear she needed narrators to fulfill two functions: first, to show how different the...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2018 2:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

In chapter 2 of Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heightswe find Lockwood in a very awkward situation. He enters Wuthering Heights and, from the moment he goes inside, he sees some of the weirdest...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2011 2:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Pathetic fallacy is a key element of this novel, but it is far more apparent in Chapter 9, where Heathcliff's rage and incipient anger is experienced as the storm that blows over the tree into...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2013 5:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In an era of sentimentality about the patriarchal family and the domestic hearth (Dicken's A Christmas Carol, with its poor but idyllic Cratchit family, was written only a few years before...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2019 11:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The Earnshaws, who live at Wuthering Heights, are a dysfunctional family. Mr. Earnshaw picks up Heathcliff, an orphan waif, on the streets of Liverpool and adopts him. Mr. Earnsahw ends up favoring...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2017 10:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

The supernatural element of Chapter 3 of Wuthering Heights initiates Gothic motifs as well as establishing some of the tension among characters. When Zillah sneaks Lockwood into a room that...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2013 7:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

This quote comes from Chapter 11 and is uttered by Cathy to her husband, Edgar Linton, after a confrontation that he and Heathcliff have had earlier on. Edgar is of course extremely frustrated...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2013 6:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

It is in Chapter Five of this novel that we can find the answer to this question. As the health of Mr. Earnshaw begins to fail and the animosity between Hindley and Heathcliff becomes ever more...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2011 12:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Lockwood commits several blunders in Chapter 2 of Wuthering Heights, starting perhaps with his initial assumption that climbing over the locked gate to pay an unannounced visit to Wuthering Heights...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2019 1:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

A gamin (a street "urchin" or homeless child) whom Mr. Earnshaw brings back with him on his three-day trip to Liverpool, the newly named Heathcliff is named after an Earnshaw child who has died....

Latest answer posted January 13, 2014 6:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is full of dualities in themes, settings, characters, and symbols. As the other editor has said, I would classify the symbols are "wild" vs. "civilized" rather than "good" vs....

Latest answer posted June 1, 2010 7:17 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

You might want to consider the classic Gothic technique of narration. We have framing narratives and multiple layers of narrative. At some points, we have Lockwood telling us what was told to him...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2011 11:51 am UTC

4 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

That's a huge question. The conventional wisdom is that Wuthering Heights is a novel of grand passions, filled with Gothic touches, while Jane Eyre is more buttoned down, more concerned with...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2017 12:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

While it could plausibly be argued that Wuthering Heights is a cautionary tale about the dangers of loving too much, that was not Bronte's intent. But let's go through how that argument would look:...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2016 8:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

While Linton Heathcliff's specific illness is never spelled out, the evidence within the text points to tuberculosis. Throughout his life, he is constantly sick with one ailment or another,...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2020 11:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In the novel 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte, Catherine and Heathcliffe's bond is os close,even as children, that they sometimes feel like one person. As believers in the Christian faith the...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2009 9:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff carefully explains to Nelly Dean why he is not taking his final revenge. Heathcliff says he could exact revenge by separating the young lovers as he and Catherine were cruelly separated....

Latest answer posted September 14, 2019 2:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Nelly goes to visit Isabella, who was recently married to Heathcliff and is now living at Wuthering Heights. There, she runs into Heathcliff, who asks after Catherine's health. Nelly tells him that...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2019 2:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

As Catherine explains to Nelly in a moment of anguish after she accepts Edgar's marriage proposal, she "loves" Edgar. She then proceeds to describe what that love is, saying she loves him because...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2019 5:11 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

The death of his wife leads to a pattern of self-destruction for Hindley. He begins to drink and gamble heavily. This leads him deeper and deeper into depression. Hindley takes no interest in his...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2010 4:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is quite distinct from most novels of the Victorian Age. She does set it in the Yorkshire moors of northern England, a rural, isolated region. She also depicts the strict social...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2009 8:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

This quote comes from Chapter Three of this incredible novel and comes just before the strange dream that Lockwood has as he falls asleep in Wuthering Heights, having been forced to stay the night...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2011 8:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

One way of answering this question would be to point to the way in which marriage between the various characters of this novel actually acts as a foil, as in the majority of cases, marriage places...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2012 3:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Chapter Six is the first chapter where the contrasting worlds of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange collide, and it is clear from the description of the Grange that Heathcliff narrates to...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2013 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Note that this is a comment made by Nelly Dean to Lockwood as she narrates the past events that have led up to the present. This comment describes the gradual change in her feelings towards Linton,...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2011 12:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

At the beginning of Wuthering Heights, Lockwood gets trapped at the Heights by a snowstorm. He is allowed to sleep in a certain forbidden bedroom, which used to be Catherine Earnshaw's. While...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2019 10:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

The passionate love that forms the basis of the narrative in Bronte's Wuthering Heights is an all- encompassing expression. Given how it is shown in different contexts with the same intensity, it...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2014 11:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

You will probably get many opinions on this. I used to believe that Heathcliff was not a realistic character. I used to believe he was symbolic of the themes of evil, passion, obsession, revenge,...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2010 3:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff claims to have come for a short visit only, "just to have one glimpse of (Catherine's) face, a start of surprise, perhaps, and pretended pleasure", yet he tells Nelly that he...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2008 6:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Throughout Wuthering Heights Catherine Earnshaw is torn between the dictates of established social convention and the emotional demands of the heart. Each side of this terrible quandary is...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2018 7:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

Wuthering Heights

When Emily Bronte wrote Wuthering Heights people were shocked. How, one wonders, was she able to depict violent human nature, given the seeming uneventfulness of her life? She was the daughter of...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2012 7:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

Edgar Linton blames Catherine for Hareton’s outburst, because she did not pay attention to him. When Catherine arrives, Hareton wants her to see that he has learned to read. Catherine calls him a...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2013 4:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Wuthering Heights

In Wuthering Heights, Lockwood and Nelly are complementary narrators. They are foils in nearly every way. Lockwood; Nelly male; female stuffy (formal) style; plain (informal, intimate) style...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2010 1:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

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